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E.I. Medical Imaging Portable Ultrasound Solution Blog

Are You Pregnancy Checking Using A Portable Ultrasound This Fall?

Posted by Jim Turner on Thu, Sep 05, 2013 @ 09:53 AM

pregnancy checking your herdI am an avid reader of Bovine Magazine, okay I have a confession, I am not a hard copy magazine guy as I like to get my news and information in the digital world using my phone or tablet.  We pay very close attention to what is happening in the bovine veterinary world as a large portion of our target demographic comes from the bovine veterinary market.  In fact, we currently have a campaign to help the veterinarian with their practice in the bovine market in both the beef and dairy segments.  Our campaign is about, "Helping your practice makes perfect sense." We feel a responsibility to help the veterinarian with their everyday practice to insure they are getting the most from our Ibex® Portable Ultrasound System.

In a recent article produced by Dave Sparks, DVM of the Oklahoma State University Extension, he brings up why food animal veterinarians should be pregnancy checking their herds now instead of waiting later.  His points I want to highlight include the following:

  • Far too many small to midsized cattle producers are saving pennies by not pregnancy testing while wasting dollars by not knowing which cows are open.

  • The old standby for pregnancy checking is rectal palpation.  In this procedure the veterinarian enters through the rectum and palpates the reproductive tract through the rectal wall.

  • Ultrasound will detect earlier pregnancies than most operators can detect confidently by rectal palpation and also may show pathological conditions that rectal palpation may miss. (emphasis added)

  • A disadvantage is that it will take several days to be notified of the results so you probably will need to re-gather the cows to sort off the open ones.  Another disadvantage is that it only tells you if the cow is pregnant or open and gives no indication of how far along the pregnancy is.  Rectal palpation and ultrasound will indicate fairly closely what stage of pregnancy the cow is in. (emphasis added)

For obvious reasons we would love all producers to be pregnancy checking their herds using the ultrasound method instead of using either the palpation method or using the blood test method.

Addressing each point above I can say that the first of his points is a common sense approach to handling your herd.  Anytime you are not pregnancy checking your herd, you are rolling the dice as to whether your cows are open. Spending money on cows that are open and will not be producing a return on investment is a gamble. I should point out however that it is a cost and one that has to be weighed with all the other factors of managing the herd for the best return.

Ibex® Customizable Extention (I.C.E.)In point two, I thought it important that we address the idea that rectal palpation has a very similar procedure to ultrasound.  An ultrasound has the same rectal entry point that requires a veterinarian to check using their arm, but by using the Ibex® Customizable Extension (I.C.E.) handle, an "arm free" accessory, the procedure could be less invasive. The veterinarian saves wear and tear on the cow and more importantly perhaps, their arm.

In the third idea I have added some emphasis on the point that ultrasound shows some fairly significant differences to rectal palpation that are very important.  An example of a difference would be whether the fetus is a viable fetus. There are many chances to misdiagnose a pregnant cow using palpation when palpation or feeling a viable fetus is not usually possible by just feel. It is tough to feel a heartbeat.  Other abnormalities of a fetus, that may not be seen from palpation and only on ultrasound, may be missed and the pregnancy may turn out to be incorrect. In this instance seeing is believing.

In the final point, I have added emphasis to the idea that blood testing cows appears to be a cumbersome and time consuming process.  Time is not always the friend of the producer and something that needs to be weighed into the herd management plan.  The last emphasis in the final point is on the idea that blood testing cannot show at what stage the pregnancy is in or the gestation of the cow. This may be an important factor in the management of the herd. And it should also be noted that blood testing cows does not take into account false positives of cows that may have a fetus that is not viable or has an abnormality.  This is something that needs to be addressed in the decision making process.

It appears that Dr. Sparks would have us believe that using ultrasound for pregnancy checking cows is cost prohibitive to the producers and that this method might be too expensive hurting the bottom line for the management of the herd.  It was pointed out that regions and pricing varies, and we have not collected enough data to make a pronouncement of the costs involved in any of the processes mentioned. This is something that veterinarians and their clients should discuss.  It may be that palpation and ultrasound are about the same price, making more sense to go with ultrasound. The cost of blood testing appears to be less but by the time you add all the added process and the cost of shipping and waiting, I think it is a costly and not an exact process with a good return on investment. Until blood testing is more of a contemporary test providing real time results it does not seem like the best choice.

Our recent campaign is to help veterinarians and their practice. To us this makes perfect sense.  We would love to have you contact us to determine if buying an ultrasound makes sense for you and your practice. Right now in the month of September we have a program that allows you to buy an Ibex® Portable Ultrasound at never before seen prices.  If you are a producer, ask your veterinarian to use ultrasound on your herd. We want to help the veterinarian but we also want to help you!

Let us know, are you performing ultrasound, blood testing or palpating your herd?  Are you pregnancy checking your herd this fall?  If not, you might want to explore the opportunity to succeed.

 

Get Your Special September  Pricing on the Ibex® NOW!

Tags: cow ultrasound, Bovine ultrasound, Veterinary Business, veterinary practice tips, beef cattle ultrasound, beef cow ultrasound, Arms free bovine ultrasound, beef heifer ultrasound, herd management, veterinary business marketing

Let demand dictate a veterinary ultrasound equipment purchase

Posted by Mia Varra on Thu, Mar 21, 2013 @ 03:13 PM

 Buy Animal Ultrasound


By; Amanda  Bertholf

When it comes to the right time to buy equipment, like a veterinary ultrasound, consider letting demand for your ultrasound services dictate your equipment purchase.

Scott Larsen, DVM, owner of Larsen Veterinary and Embryo Transfer in Valentine Neb.,

ROIsays he tries to be forward thinking about what he could do with the equipment right away, and then he considers how much room for growth there would be with the new purchase. “I am not one to leverage equipment,” he says. “If I can’t pay for it, I don’t need it.”

 


Of course, doing your homework before a big purchase is important, and so is knowing what’s available. Are all the bells and whistles necessary, or is this a luxury you can do without? “Paying for something that will help you make money is not a bad investment obviously, but I don’t want that hanging over my head,” Larsen says. “I usually try to get by with a little less and build that portion of the business. Then when I have the business established, I trade up for the equipment.” 



When you’re considering return on investment, look at how much revenue you’d generate with the equipment in a set period of time, or how many procedures you’d need to conduct to completely pay for it. “As far as reproductive ultrasound goes, that was a procedure I could do at a time of year that my practice was slow, therefore ROI was relatively fast because I was not sacrificing other work for ultrasound,” Larsen says. “What started eight years ago as a time filler has turned into my No. 1 profit center.”

(Dr. Paul Chard of Cattleman's Resource Inc., Brush, CO demonstrates the Ibex's Arm-Free I.C.E. "Ibex Customizable Extension" at preg check time.)


Larsen says the most common procedures he performs are bovine ultrasound for pregnancy and fetal sexing. He checks for pregnancy at about 90 days of gestation. Over the last couple of years, the percentage of his herds that use ultrasound on the adult cows has drastically increased. “I use it to group the herd into calving windows so they can be better managed,” he says. “Not only does it save in feed costs, but it has also has eliminated scours.” The savings in scours treatments and vaccines more than covers the cost to ultrasound, and it allows Larsen to generate more income off the producers, rather than looking for new ones. “In the sense, the use of hands-free ultrasound is becoming a large part of my practice and it’s allowing me to stretch out the per head investment in ultrasound machines and probes into more cattle.”

 




Tags: Bovine ultrasound, Arm-free bovine ultrasound, Arms free bovine ultrasound, portable bovine ultrasound

Have you heard? Bovine Arms-free scanning is here!

Posted by Mia Varra on Thu, Oct 06, 2011 @ 02:53 PM

 

By Hilary Parker


Just when you thought the Ibex family of ultrasound systems couldn’t get easier to use, we pull a fast one on you.


Our latest Ibex portable ultrasound  accessory was engineered to lessen fatigue and stress on your arms when performing ultrasounds. Can you guess what it is?


It’s not a magic wand, if that’s what you were thinking. But it’s darn close. We call it the I.C.E., or Ibex Customizable Extension.

Ibex ultrasound ICE
The I.C.E. probe extension offers flexibility unparalleled in the industry. Developed and tested in conjunction with veterinarians, this accessory is designed to promote a longer and more productive career for its users.


It features a customizable angle that allows it to be used in a variety of diagnostic procedures, including a flex section that is easy to bend to exactly the desired angle.

cow scanning arms free

bovine scanning extension
In addition, the patent-pending I.C.E. is easy to insert and remove, making it safer and less stressful on both user and animal. And its rugged design ensures durability, even under the most demanding field conditions.

 


“We’re getting a great reaction to the introduction of I.C.E.,” says Nate Alexander, E.I. Medical sales representative. “And one complaint: ‘Couldn’t you guys have invented this sooner?’”


The I.C.E. is made using FDA-approved food- and drug-grade polymer alloys and is compatible with the Ibex Linear 6.2MHz Transducer.


And, like the Ibex itself, the I.C.E. is water-resistant and easy to clean. What’s more, it’s designed, manufactured and serviced in the United States of America.

Let us know what you think of the new I.C.E?

Tags: hands free scanning, linear probe extension, Bovine ultrasound, arm free ultrasound, Arms free bovine ultrasound

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